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Grasp the complexities of legal, political and ethical dilemmas

Law and Politics of International Security

Your multi-disciplinary background will make you very attractive to potential future employers: understanding the process of policymaking while also knowing how to talk to the lawyers. Your research and writing skills will be top notch, while your analytical skills will make you uniquely qualified to find solutions to complex problems.

Graduates have found jobs in a wide variety of fields, including the military, the Red Cross, human rights organisations, academia, the private sector, government and international organisations. In all these contexts, having a background in both international law and politics is a great asset.  
Students at VU Amsterdam also come from all over the world, and those different cultural backgrounds mean you’ll not only learn a lot from one another – you’ll also graduate with your own international network. Plus, you’ll develop the confidence to voice your own opinions and to be self-critical, which are valuable skills in the workplace.

What can you do after your Master's degree?

Start working or continue your research

Graduates from the Law and Politics of International Security programme have taken up a wide range of positions: for example, as legal advisors for the military, legal officers for the Red Cross, diplomats at ministries of foreign affairs or at international organisations, and researchers and professors.  

Since many students come from abroad, there are plenty of opportunities to work back in their country of origin or to move to other countries across the globe.

While most graduates from the programme start working, around a quarter chose to continue their research by doing a PhD. For those students wanting an academic career, we also offer the faculty-wide Research Talent Track – a huge advantage if you want to brush up on your research skills.

You’ll be well-positioned to work in:

  • Government ministries
  • Parliament
  • NGO’s
  • International organisations (e.g. OSCE, UN, EU)
  • Private security firms
  • Law firms
  • Courts (as a judge in training)
  • Universities (in PhD positions)